Maui ʻĀina-based Community Education Resources

This page is being launched during the 2021-22 school year to provide resources to promote community partnership and ʻāina-based learning both in the classroom and in our Maui community. Below you will find virtual huakaʻi (field trips) and online activities created with program partners during the 2020-21 school year as part of our Maui Aloha ʻĀina Virtual Classroom. We also plan to add a list of community partners who can serve as ʻāina-based education resources by providing expertise, guest speakers, lesson plans and/or hosting student groups. We will also be adding information on teacher professional development resources including our Kūkulu Pilina course sponsored by Office of Hawaiian Education, which focuses on how community partnership and ʻāina-based education can deepen students’ sense of HĀ (Nā Hopena Aʻo BREATH framework) through ʻāina aloha practices contextualized to their particular place and community.

 

 

Maui Aloha ʻĀina Virtual Classroom

The Maui Aloha ʻĀina Virtual Classroom was created by Maui Huliau Foundation and program partners duiring the 2020-21 school year for students to learn about local ecosystems and conservation, and to maintain their pilina (connection) with our ʻāina during a challenging year of hybrid learning. Most units focus on a place or program partner on Maui and include 2-5 activities which are submitted using Google Forms. For some activities, students will be asked to visit a site in person and/or to pick up a supply kit. Most units also include a virtual huakaʻi (field trip) video created by our filmmaking students.

Overview of Units:

Kahoʻolawe Island Reserve Commission
Going Zero Waste (with Huliau alumni)
Waiheʻe Refuge with Hawaiian Islands Land Trust
Maui Nui Botanical Gardens
Re-Tree Tree Planting Activity
The Nature Conservancy’s Waikamoi Preserve with East Maui Watershed Partnership and Maui Forest Bird Recovery Project
Nohoʻana Farm
Kōʻieʻie Fishpond and the Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary
Wai: Maui’s Water Resources
Coral Reefs with Maui Ocean Center
Keālia with Alakaʻina, Maui Digital Bus
Sustainable Lifestyles by Huliau Leadership Council
Watershed Partnerships
Mālama Kaʻehu
ʻIke ʻĀina: Sense of Place with Kanu Ka ʻIke
Kīpuka Olowalu
Kipahulu ʻOhana (Mālama i ke Kai programs)
Resilience Unit

How to use classroom resources: Maui grade 6-12 teachers can register below to access our Google Classroom to explore the resources available. Teachers who want to use Google Forms need to contact us so that we can send you a copy to use with your students. As schools have shifted back to in-person learning, many of these resources can also be modified to use in class.

Virtual Huakaʻi

These 12 virtual huakaʻi (field trip) videos were created with community partners by our Huliau Filmmaking Students during the 2020-12 school year. Each huakaʻi has activities that go with it in our virtual classroom above. Some of huakaʻi feature places that students can visit on their own. You can also watch these videos on our Virtual Huakaʻi YouTube playlist.

Kūkulu Pilina Teacher PDE3 Course

In fall 2021, we facilitated our first PDE3 course open to Maui DOE secondary teachers! This course used many of the resources created with community partners for our Maui Aloha ʻĀina Virtual Classroom during the 2020-21 school year.

The purpose of this course is to help Maui educators realize the potential for community partnership and ʻāina-based education to deepen their students’ sense of HĀ through ʻāina aloha practices contextualized to their particular place and community.

The course was sponsored by the Office of Hawaiian Education and included 6 online and in-person sessions between taught alongside community partners. We hope to offer another course sometime in spring or summer of 2022. If you are intersted in this course, you can email info@mauihuliaufoundation.org

 

Additional Resources Coming Soon

During the 2021-22 school year, we plan to work with community partners to add a list of community partners who can serve as ʻāina-based education resources by providing expertise, guest speakers, lesson plans and/or hosting student groups. We also plan to add additonal in-class resources and to explore ways for teachers to share lesson plan ideas.